Beer Review: Zambia

mosi
As soon as we had stepped over the border from Malawi into Zambia, the hunt for a drinkable beer was on. After being permanently scarred by Malawi’s Shake Shake, there had to be something better here. Whilst we didn’t have a long time in Zambia, we did manage to try the nation’s two most popular beers. We unfortunately discovered that they also love their traditional local brew… essentially Shake Shake with another name.
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Posted from Northern, Zambia.

A Close Encounter With A Wild African Elephant

An elephant coming in to the dining room to see if there's anything to eat.

An elephant coming in to the dining room to see if there’s anything to eat.

A large elephant emerged from behind one of the chalets. We heard one of the owners of the South Luangwa lodge we were staying at say “Oh, this elephant is quite unconventional, stay still. Don’t move!” From our seat on the very edge of the patio we watched silently as the elephant moved toward us. As it stopped in front of us the scale was apparent. It’s head was larger than our head and torso combined with tusks stretching on for what felt like forever. I stayed frozen as the huge beast sniffed all over Leckie, brushing its trunk against his arm. Then, knocking Leckie’s wine glass over, it moved on to me. My heart pounded as it sniffed me and I closed my eyes to quell a moment of panic.

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Posted from Northern, Zambia.

Beer Review: Tanzania

tanzania
I’m not going to lie. We drank A LOT of beer in Tanzania, especially on the beaches of Zanzibar. I almost feel overqualified for this review thinking back on it. The fact that we spent a couple of weeks in a beautiful, sunny, island paradise made them go down easy, and the fact they were cheap every night during the 2014 World Cup games certainly didn’t stop them flowing.
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Posted from Nungwi, Zanzibar North, Tanzania.

Malawi: Dedza’s Ancient Art and Avoided Questions

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Travelling from Cape Maclear to Dedza was quite a challenge despite the relatively short distance seperating the two. With no regular public transport between them we once again resorted to the ancient art of hitchhiking. Unfortunately the first four cars to pass us were other white travellers, and even though three out of four had empty seats, they turned us down because they were ‘full’ or simply tried to ignore us as they slowly drove past us at the crossroads. Thankfully car number five was a Malawian with an empty ute tray. No problems.

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Posted from Dedza, Central Region, Malawi.